Further thoughts on Luke 10:2 … “but”

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“The harvest is plentiful, but the laborers are few. Therefore pray earnestly to the Lord of the harvest to send out laborers into his harvest.”  Luke 10:2

Continuing the series…

We all know it’s coming – we brace ourselves mentally, emotionally, sometimes even physically.

We know something is coming when someone starts a conversation along the lines of, “I want you to know that I really value all your hard work and effort, but…”

Or, “I would have done that thing you asked me to do, but…”

Or, “you do that really well, but…”

Or, a personal peeve for me is, “I’m sorry, but…”

There is always contrast, for sure, but normally it is a “this is good… but… that is bad” idea conveyed when we use that little word, “but” in the middle of a sentence.  And if you think about it, the words following the “but” in the sentences we use typically require not just our attention, but also our action.

The harvest is plentiful, but

We know it’s coming – there is a problem that is about to be laid out in front of us.  Things are not as they should – or could – be.

And so it is in Luke 10:2.  The harvest is plentiful – Jesus has declared that it is so.  He is telling us that this is true… but.

There is so much that comes to mind as I think about this turn in the phrase.  Jesus is taking us from hopeful, glorious, breathtaking heights and saying – “but friends, there is a problem in front of us.”

It makes me wonder what it would have been like to be listening to him as the words were coming out of his mouth.  If I heard his voice and saw his face and recognized the compassion he has for the harvest yet to be brought in to his heavenly storehouse – would I react with the “yeah, yeah – harvest, workers, got it” yawn that marks so many of our hearts?

This reminds me first of the Creation, when everything that God made was good, good, good – until the “but” came along. “You may surely eat of every tree of the garden, but of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil you shall not eat, for in the day that you eat of it you shall surely die.”

Everything around you is good, Adam… but.

It was worthy of his attention.  And it was worthy of is active response.  When God points something out to us, we need to pay attention to him.  It’s not like a tour guide pointing out interesting sites and telling fun stories.  We can pay attention to those or not and while we might miss out on some interesting or even helpful things – we’re not going to loose much for our lack of focus.

No, this was profoundly important.  The consequences of not paying attention were life-altering – for a lot more of us than just Adam and Eve.

But” means something.

However, there is another “but” right on the heels of that first one.

“But for Adam, there was not found a helper suitable for him,” and “it was not good that the man should be alone.”  God had declared that all of his creation was good – gloriously good! – and then God said there was something that needed to be addressed.  And he was right.  Adam needed a helper suitable for him, so God provided one perfectly fit for the task at hand.  Eve was created and things went from good to very good.

And this should be very good new to us as well.  God can handle the problems he identifies.

There are so many things that are not as they should or could or ought to be.  What is my response when I hear them – read them?  How should I respond to the reality that Jesus has declared, but…?

I know this might be heady, almost academic-sounding stuff for some, but bear with me.  Jesus has told us something is unshakably true… but we act like it isn’t – or that somehow it doesn’t really matter.  We tune him out with all of our electronic or social or academic distractions the way we tune out the tour guide at the museum.

Would we really have the guts to do that to his face?  Would we ever even want to?

“The harvest is plentiful, but….” should stop us dead in our tracks.  That warning of a negative reality to what Christ has just told us should be shocking news to us that makes us stop what we’re doing, put down what we’re being distracted with, turn away from the lesser things and say, “wait – what?!”

The good news is that, just like in the Garden when everything was declared “good… but,” Jesus doesn’t just leave us on our own to figure out how to solve the problem – he gives us the solution in his next breath.

We are fools if we ignore the problem, but we are lacking faith if we think we need to scramble and come up with some kind of plan to fix things.

“The harvest is plentiful, but…” is a “good news – bad news” scenario.  The good news is wonderfully good.  And the bad news has a solution.  But we need to pay attention… for as in the Garden, the failure to do so can have life-altering consequences.

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